race


race
race 1 Race, nation, people, even though in technical use they are commonly differentiated, are often used popularly and interchangeably to designate one of a number of great divisions of mankind, each made up of an aggregate of persons who are thought of, or think of themselves, as comprising a distinct unit. In technical discriminations, all more or less controversial and often lending themselves to great popular misunderstanding or misuse, race is anthropological and ethnological in force, usually implying a distinct physical type with certain unchanging characteristics (as a particular color of skin or shape of skull)
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the Caucasian race

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the Mongolian race

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Sometimes, and more controversially, other presumed common factors are chosen, as place of origin
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the Nordic race

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or common root language
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the Aryan race

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In popular use race can apply to any more or less clearly defined group thought of as a unit usually because of a common or presumed common past
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the Anglo-Saxon race

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the Celtic race

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the Hebrew race

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Nation, primarily political in force, usually designates the citizenry as a whole of a sovereign state and implies a certain homogeneity because of com-mon laws, institutions, customs, or loyalty
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the British nation

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the French nation

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the house must have been built before this country was a nationTate

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what is a nation? A group of human beings recognizing a common history and a common culture, yearning for a common destiny, assuming common habits, and generally attached to a specific piece of the earth's surface— David Bernstein

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Sometimes it is opposed to state
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a state is accidental; it can be made or unmade; but a nation is something real which can be neither made nor destroyed— J. R. Green

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and often not clearly distinguishable from race in comprising any large group crossing national boundaries and with something significantly in common
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the children of the world are one nation; the very old, another— Jan Struther

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{

for the two nations that inhabit the earth, the rich and the poor— Sitwell

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the Gypsy nation

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People, sometimes interchangeable with nation though stressing a cultural or social rather than a national unity, can apply to a body of persons, as a whole or as individuals, who show a consciousness of solidarity or common characteristics suggesting a common culture or common interests or ideals and a sense of kinship
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the Mexican peoplePrewett

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{

the British and American peoplesSir Winston Churchill

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we, the people of the United States— U. S. Constitution

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{

we, the peoples of the United Nations— U. N. Charter

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{

a new government, which, for certain purposes, would make the people of the several states one peopleTaney

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2 *variety, subspecies, breed, cultivar, strain, clone, stock

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Race — may refer to:General* Racing competitions ** The Race (yachting race), or La course du millénaire , a no rules round the world sailing event * Race (biology), classification of flora and fauna * Race (classification of human beings) * Race and… …   Wikipedia

  • Race — Race, n. [OE. ras, res, rees, AS. r[=ae]s a rush, running; akin to Icel. r[=a]s course, race. [root]118.] 1. A progress; a course; a movement or progression. [1913 Webster] 2. Esp., swift progress; rapid course; a running. [1913 Webster] The… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Race — Race, n. [F. race; cf. Pr. & Sp. raza, It. razza; all from OHG. reiza line, akin to E. write. See {Write}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The descendants of a common ancestor; a family, tribe, people, or nation, believed or presumed to belong to the same… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • RACE — can refer to:* RACE (Europe), Research and Development in Advanced Communications Technologies in Europe * RACE (container), Railways of Australia Container Express, a slightly wider version than the ISO shipping container * RACE (automobile… …   Wikipedia

  • Race — Race, v. t. 1. To cause to contend in a race; to drive at high speed; as, to race horses. [1913 Webster] 2. To run a race with. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Race — (r[=a]s), n. [OF. ra[ i]z, L. radix, icis. See {Radix}.] A root. A race or two of ginger. Shak. [1913 Webster] {Race ginger}, ginger in the root, or not pulverized. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Race — Race, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Raced} (r[=a]st); p. pr. & vb. n. {Racing} (r[=a] s[i^]ng).] 1. To run swiftly; to contend in a race; as, the animals raced over the ground; the ships raced from port to port. [1913 Webster] 2. (Steam Mach.) To run too… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Race — (r[=a]s), v. t. To raze. [Obs.] Spenser. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • RACE — s. f. coll. Lignée, tous ceux qui viennent d une même famille. Il est d une bonne race, de bonne race, d une race illustre, ancienne. Il sort, il vient d une noble race, d une race de gens de bien. Il est de la race royale. Les trois races des… …   Dictionnaire de l'Academie Francaise, 7eme edition (1835)

  • RACE — n. f. Lignée, ensemble des ascendants et des descendants d’une même famille. Il est d’une bonne race, de bonne race, d’une race illustre, ancienne. Il sort, il vient d’une noble race. Il est de race royale. Les rois de la première, de la seconde …   Dictionnaire de l'Academie Francaise, 8eme edition (1935)

  • race — I. noun Etymology: Middle English ras, from Old Norse rās; akin to Old English rǣs rush Date: 14th century 1. chiefly Scottish the act of running 2. a. a strong or rapid current of water flowing through a narrow channel b. a watercourse used… …   New Collegiate Dictionary


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